Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures-The Facts You Should Know

workplace-discipline

It’s fairly simple, you know.

One of the easiest ways for employers to blow a lot of cash is to fail to follow proper procedures when dismissing an employee.

No matter how justifiable the dismissal may be it will be a costly affair if proper procedures are not followed.

Employers have a legal obligation to provide their employees with written procedures to be followed before dismissal of an employee.

The safest approach for the employer to take is to follow the best practice set out in Statutory Instrument 146/2000. The Labour Relations Commission have published codes of practice for many aspects of employment.

Here is the Labour Relations Commission code of practice for fair disciplinary and grievance procedures.If you are an employer it will pay you to read it and be very familiar with it.

It is not mandatory to adopt the procedures set out but it makes good business sense to do so. It is particularly important in workplaces where there is no trade union and the employee is relying on individual representation.

Both the Employment Appeals Tribunal and the Civil Courts will measure your procedures against what is set out in the Industrial Relations Act, 1990 Declaration Order when it comes to adjudicating in a dispute.

The guiding principles of a good disciplinary and grievance procedure is that

  1. It is fair
  2. It is clear
  3. The penalties that can be imposed are clear and
  4. There is an internal appeals mechanism.

Broadly good practice demands that

  1. The issue is brought to the attention of the immediate manager and then progressed up the line to more senior management
  2. The employee is represented
  3. Referral to a third party depending on local arrangements.

The penalties should include, in the first instance an oral warning, then a written warning, then a final written warning, suspension without pay, transfer to another job or part of the company, demotion, and dismissal.

The basic test at all stages of the procedure is “what would a reasonable employer do in the circumstances” and this will depend on the problem, be it incompetence, misconduct, or whatever issue arises. There is no set number of warnings required as it will depend on the circumstances and cases of serious misconduct may justify moving to a later stage of the procedure more quickly.

Less serious problems may be dealt with by pointing out the shortcomings, providing the opportunity to improve, the offer of training and allowing room and time for improvement. When this route is adopted the employees should be advised of the consequences of not improving and what penalties may apply.

For employers it is strongly advisable to have your grievance and disciplinary procedures reviewed regularly as the legislation can be updated regularly, case law may necessitate change, and the circumstances in the workplace can necessitate it.

Successful claims for unfair dismissal or constructive dismissal can be incredibly expensive for the employer.

Firstly there is the award to be paid to the successful claimant and then there is the time and money and legal advice required to prepare for a Rights Commissioner or Employment Appeals Tribunal hearing.

You might also be interested in a step by step disciplinary  procedure.

You may be interested in how to avoid costly employment related claims.

Online Training Course

You may be interested in my online training course: How to Carry Out a Disciplinary Procedure in the Irish Workplace

Do You Make These Mistakes as an Employer in Ireland?

employers-mistakes

Let’s admit it.

Making a costly mistake is easy when it comes to employment law in Ireland.

The scenarios below are quite common in the Irish workplace. Each of them has the potential to be very costly for the employer if he/she acts on the common misconceptions contained in these hypothetical situations.

My employee is 67 and I want him/her to retire-can I just tell him/her that he/she must retire soon?

No, not unless you have stipulated a retirement age in the contract of employment. There is no general statutory fixed retirement age in Ireland. There is a retirement age set in some public sector jobs and in occupations such as Gardai, the fire service, and the Judiciary.

However in the private sector, if it is not in the contract of employment, the employee can continue working.

I never gave my employee a contract. He has worked with me for 7 years but now I want to give him a contract to reflect the changed economic circumstances.

Firstly, just because you failed to give your employee a written contract does not mean he doesn’t have a contract. He does.

And whatever written contract you propose giving him now must reflect the terms and conditions he has enjoyed to date. Any changes to these terms must be with his consent as not to obtain his consent will amount to a unilateral changing of the contract by you as employer.

This is not permissible and will leave you open to a claim for breach of contract and/or constructive dismissal.

I am not happy with my employee’s performance and I want to replace him with someone who will do the job properly.

You cannot do so without going through a procedure which is fair and allows the employee to improve after you have brought to his attention the failings in his work. This will involve in making clear the standards required of your employee and how he is falling short.

You will need to set out the improvements required and give him a reasonable time period within which to come up to the mark. You will also need to give warnings that failure to improve sufficiently may lead to dismissal (ultimately).

My employee has been out on certified sick leave for ages and I have been told I cannot dismiss her while she is on sick leave so I am stuck with her..

This is not the case-you can fairly dismiss in certain circumstances, even when your employee is out sick. However it will depend on the needs of your workplace, the length of service of your employee, whether the sickness is a long term absence or a series of short term illness related absences.

So, while it is not easy to fairly dismiss while your employee is on sick leave, it is possible.

Always consult a solicitor in relation to cases like those outlined above; each case will be hugely influenced by the particular circumstances and making decisions based on misunderstandings can prove very costly.

Readers’ Questions

Can an employer cut my wages without notice?

No, see this article.

Where do I go if my employment rights have been infringed in Ireland?

There is a wide range of options available if your employment rights have been infringed. Click Here.

Who is not covered by unfair dismissal laws?

Read all about unfair dismissals and constructive dismissals here.

Does NERA tell the employer my complaint if I complain?

Read about NERA inspections here.

I am 66 years old-am I entitled to a redundancy payment?

Yes, the law has changed in this area. Check out redundancy in Ireland here.

Is my employer responsible for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace?

Yes. Read about sexual harassment, equality and discrimination in the workplace here.

Can I bring a case for unfair dismissal if I have less than 1 year’s service?

Yes, take a look at dismissal during the probationary period.

What is direct and indirect discrimination on the grounds of disability?

Take a look at equality and discrimination here.

Are you entitled to a written contract?

Yes, or at least you are entitled to a written statement of the terms and conditions of your employment within 2 months of commencing employment.

What are the important changes in parental leave in Ireland?

Take a look at the new parental leave entitlements in Ireland.

What are employees’ rights when a company is taken over?

This situation is covered by the TUPE (transfer of undertakings) regulations.

Can you take a case for unfair dismissal where dismissed on the grounds of age Ireland?

Yes, and you can take a case for discrimination to the equality tribunal under the Employment Equality Acts.

What is a fixed term teaching contract?

Read more about teachers’ fixed term contracts.

What are workers rights in Ireland regarding dismissal?

Read more about workers rights regarding dismissal in Ireland here.

How to calculate annual leave Ireland

 Learn how to calculate annual leave and pay here.

How many sick days are you entitled to in Ireland?

Learn about sick leave and sick pay here.

How much does it cost to bring a case to the employment appeals tribunal?

This will depend on a number of factors including whether you choose to hire a solicitor or rely on a non-solicitor such as a HR person or not. It will also depend on the strength of your case as some solicitors will take on a good case on a “no win, no fee” basis.

Sample employment contract Ireland

Contact us and we will send you a sample employment contract. Drafting your own contract however, even with the benefit of a template, can be problematic as each employment situation is different and unique.

 Are all workplace policies contractual?

No, it depends on whether the staff handbook/workplace policies have been incorporated into the contract of employment.

In most cases, we do not recommend this for two reasons.

1. If an employer fails to follow a policy/procedure (either deliberately or inadvertently) that would give the employee a claim for breach of contract on top of any other claim he/she might have (e.g. unfair dismissal, discrimination, etc.)

2. As businesses evolve, policies and procedures will need to change – if they form part of the employee’s contract of employment, you would need the consent of all the employees to any such changes. Non-contractual policies and procedures can be varied by the employer without needing to obtain the consent of the staff.

What are the basic principles of fair dismissals?

Procedural fairness and substantial grounds are needed to justify dismissal.

What is the pay for a fixed term specified purpose contract for teaching in Ireland?

 See education law in Ireland website for more information.

What are the grounds that the employment equality act 1998-2011 prohibits not to allow discrimination?

 See the 9 grounds here.

What is the average holiday entitlements per month in ireland?

Discover how to calculate holiday entitlements here.

Can employer take wages for mistakes?

It depends on the contract and whether they are fair and reasonable. See payment of wages..

What is constructive dismissal?

Read what is constructive dismissal.

Employment contract for fixed term teacher

 Employment contract for fixed term teacher

 Can an employer reduce wages?

Yes, but it is not entirely straightforward. Learn more here.

What rights does an employee have if not a trade union member in Ireland?

The employee has full employment, contractual, statutory, and constitutional rights in relation to employment, regardless of whether he is a member of a trade union or not.

What are workers right in Ireland regarding dismissal?

 Learn more about unfair dismissal here.

Calculating annual leave entitlement for part time workers

 Learn how to calculate annual leave here.

Sample grievance procedure Ireland?

 Learn more about grievance procedures here.

How to calculate redundancy pay in Ireland

Calculating redundancy entitlements.

How to deal with workplace discrimination

 Learn more about workplace discrimination here.

Define a health and safety statement in the workplace

 Learn more about health and safety statements here.

Can you take a case for constructive dismissal if you have accepted redundancy?

Generally yes.

Retirement age Ireland

 There is no statutory general retirement age in Ireland. However, some jobs do have a mandatory retirement age eg Garda, civil service. In most private sector employment though the contract of employment must provide for a retirement age if one is required.

How to calculate parental leave

 Learn more about parental leave entitlements here.

Do workers who are paid cash have employment rights in Ireland?

Yes,  they still have a contract of employment (even if not in writing).

Can someone claim unfair dismissal even during probabtion?

Yes, but your options are very limited-you can go to the Labour Court under Industrial Relations legislation but the recommendation is not enforceable. You are depending n the moral authority of the Labour Court and the bona fides of the employer.

 If an employee resigns and cites constructive dismissal does this mean he or she going to take the employer to court?

Almost certainly.

Break entitlements for 8 hours work?

Learn more about working time and rest periods here.

How to calculate holiday pay for piece rate workers Ireland

 Learn about holiday entitlements for piece rate workers here.

How long do you need to be working to claim for unfair dismissal?

 12 months.

When does a contract become a contract of indefinite duration?

 Learn about contracts of indefinite duration here.

What can I do if dismissed on capability grounds?

Bring a claim for unfair dismissal.

Grounds for instant dismissal Ireland

 See basic principles of fair dismissal in Ireland.

Penalties associated with tupe Ireland

See tupe Ireland.

Can i get paid for holidays not taken ireland?

See holiday pay and annual leave.

What  are the duties of the employer regarding workplace safety under the safety and health at work act 2005?

See employers’ health and safety obligations.

Going back to work after maternity leave laws

 Learn more about maternity leave in Ireland.

Reckonable service for part time workers for redundancy ireland

 Read about redundancy in Ireland.

Other similar frequently asked questions:

  • No contract signed, no wages
  • Legal definition of redundancy ireland
  • What is a fixed term contract
  • on temporary contracts for over 3 years when do i get permanent
  • what does tupe mean ireland
  • disciplinary procedure example
  • do employees have the right to appeal if dismissed during probation
  • can i take a career break on receiving a cid teacher in ireland
  • what is right procedure of terminating an employees contract.
  • what is a one year fixed term contract
  • termination of employment on grounds of capability
  • are men entitled to maternity leave in ireland
  • unfair dismissal v wrongful dismissal followed
  • can a case of gross misconduct be void if the correct procedures were not followed
  • how to dimiss an employee legally in ireland
  • can u legally cut employees contracted hours in ireland
  • examples of what to include in a fixed term contract of employment in ireland
  • rules of fair procedures and natural justice ireland
  • what is the can teachers take carers leave
  • legal requirement for terminating a contract of employment
  • can lay teacher contracts qualify for cid
  • legal precedent relating to non compete clause in irish employment law
  • teaching contracts ireland right to a written contract
  • part time workers bank holiday entitlement calculator
  • contracts of employment ireland time between finish of one contract and issue of another
  • dismissing an employee for sickness ireland
  • what is a fair dismissal procedure in republic of ireland
  • right to terminate contract of employment without notice
  • is the time i am on maternity leave counted as continious service ireland
  • can you claim holiday pay when off sick
  • when an employee alleges unfair dismissal who needs to prove that the dismissal of an employee indeed has taken place
  • employer responsibilities for bullying
  • payment for annual leave on termination ireland
  • is maternity leave viewed as continuous service in ireland

The answers to most of the questions above can be found on this site-simply use the search box in the right sidebar.

If you need professional advice or assistance in this area, do not hesitate to contact us.

Discover how to reduce the chances of expensive claims by employees.

Dignity at Work Policies in Ireland-Harassment, Sexual Harassment and Bullying

bullying-at-work

Are you being bullied at work?

Or harassed?

Bullying and harassment are the acts of cowards.

But can be appallingly damaging if you are a victim. And if you are an employer in whose workplace this is allowed to happen.

Bullying, harassment, and sexual harassment claims by employees against employers can be incredibly costly affairs.

And if you are an employee and are suffering from being bullied or harassed it can be equally costly for you in terms of your health.

If you are being bullied at work there is a wide range of legal remedies open to you and you don’t have to suffer in silence.

Let’s take a look at the background to bullying, harassment and sexual harassment in the workplace in Ireland..

While there is no express statutory legal obligation on employers to have policies covering bullying, harassment, and sexual harassment it is strongly advisable.

Because the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 and the Employment Equality Acts, together with the common law, create indirect obligations which amount to pretty much the same thing.

In fact, there are three statutory codes of practice covering this area. These include

  1. the Health and Safety Authority’s code on bullying, “Code of Practice for Employers and Employees on the Prevention and Resolution of Bullying at Work
  2. the Equality Authority’s “Code of Practice on Sexual Harassment and Harassment at Work” and
  3. the “Code of Practice Detailing Procedures for Addressing Bullying in the Workplace” (“the Industrial Relation Act Code-statutory instrument 17/2012).

The obligations and responsibilities imposed by these codes of practice along with the employers’ common law duties of care and so forth really make it imperative for employers to have policies in place.

Employers who do not have a workplace policy in place dealing with these issues will have a hard time defending claims made against him as it will be difficult to show that he has discharged his statutory obligations.

Remember that an employer can potentially face civil and criminal proceedings for failure to provide a place of work that is free from bullying.

The presence (or absence) of workplace policies is admissible in evidence in any civil or criminal proceedings when such a dispute comes before a Court or tribunal such as the Labour Court, Employment Appeals Tribunal or Rights Commissioner.

Note: from 1st October, 2015 all these claims must be brought to the WRC (Workplace Relations Commission) or to civil court.

Personal injuries cases taken against employers will also be significantly influenced by the presence of policies as will legal proceedings seeking to attribute liability to the employer for the illness of an employee.

Learn more about bullying as a health and safety issue in the workplace here.

Dignity at Work Policy

One of the most efficient ways for employers to attend to the obligations imposed by the three statutory codes of practice above is to have (and implement) a dignity at work policy which would address bullying, harassment, and sexual harassment.

It is important to note that this dignity at work policy needs to be adapted to the particular circumstances of the workplace. For example if there is a safety representative or committee in place he/they will have to be consulted.

It must also be effectively communicated to employees and implemented in the workplace with regular reviews to take cognisance of any changes in legislation or codes of practice. And it must be brought to the attention of those in the workplace who have responsibility for implementing it and appropriate training should be provided.

(You may also be interested in reading Codes of Practice from the Labour Relations Commission.)

Having appropriate procedures and policies in place in your work place can minimize disputes and time wasting for both employees and employers.

They can also protect your business from costly disputes and claims and ensure that you are in compliance with the law as an employer.

We provide workplace policies and procedures for employers in the following areas:

  • sick leave/sick pay
  • leave
  • timekeeping and attendance
  • internet and email use in the workplace
  • grievances
  • disciplinary issues
  • mobile phone
  • bullying and harassment
  • breaks
  • confidentiality
  • data protection
  • use of company vehicles
  • and more.

Stress, Harassment, and Bullying at Work-The Legal Remedies

If you are being bullied at work, or are a victim of workplace stress or harassment, there are a number of legal remedies open to you.

The broad categories of causes of action you can pursue would be

  • breach of contract
  • a personal injuries claim for negligence of the employer;  your employer owes you a duty of care which is not discharged properly if you suffer one of these non physical injuries at work
  • health and safety law and the employer’s duty to provide you with a safe workplace
  • unfair dismissals (constructive dismissal)
  • equality law in respect of harassment.

Breach of contract

Your contract of employment will contain either an express or implied term that the employer will maintain your trust and confidence, that he will take reasonable care for the health and safety of his employees, that he will provide a safe system of work, that he will ensure reasonable codes of conduct in the workplace, that employees will be free in the workplace to work free from bullying and harassment.

However a claim for a personal injury arising from stress, bullying or harassment fit more naturally into the domain of tort law (civil wrong). For that reason it is more likely to be pursued as a personal injury claim.

Personal injury claim

There appears to be a trend in taking non physical injury claims as personal injury claims. However, the Injuries Board will not deal with it if it is a psychiatric/psychological injury and will simple issue an authorisation to pursue the claim through the Courts. It will invariably end up on the High Court.

The employer has a general duty of care towards his employees  under the law of torts (civil wrongs). (Learn more about negligence and torts here).

There may be a case for distinguishing between stress caused in the workplace and perhaps arising from personal circumstances. So, if there are multiple causes of stress damages may be apportioned.

Constructive dismissal

The employee can also bring a case for constructive dismissal/loss of earnings if he/she leaves the employment because of the bullying, stress or harassment; however this should be one of the last options to exercise as the burden of proof in constructive dismissal cases fall on the employee.

In Riehn v Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals [2004] 15 ELR the employee resigned due to stress caused by an excessive workload and was awarded €30,000 in loss of earnings.

The venues that you would pursue the various remedies range from the Rights Commissioner service to the Employment Appeals Tribunal to the Labour Court to the Health and Safety Authority to the Civil Courts.

Criminal prosecution

The Health Safety and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 provides for the criminal prosecution of offences.

Section 78 of the Health Safety and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 provides the penalties:

(i) on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding €3,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or both, or
(ii) on conviction on indictment to a fine not exceeding €3,000,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or both.

Section 80 of the act provides for personal liability for directors and officers of the company.

Disability claim

One of these non physical injuries could be classified as a disability under the Employment Equality Acts. If that is the case a claim to the Equality Tribunal may also be possible.

Terry Gorry & Co. Solicitors provides all the necessary policies for responsible employers.

We also represent employees who suffer personal injuries as a result of workplace stress,  harassment and/or bullying. Learn more about sexual harassment here.

Employment Rights Infringed in Ireland? Where Should You Go?

employment-law-rights

Yes, it’s confusing.

Where to go if your employment rights have been infringed?

Well, there is good news due to the new Workplace Relations Bill, 2014.

UPDATE 2015

And there were big changes introduced on 1st October 2015.

Read about the Workplace Relations Commission and the procedure for pursuing employment and equality claims now.

Prior to this there was a wide number of forums available for employees to seek to have their employment rights upheld and vindicated, as set out below.

But now you must go to the new body, the WRC.

******************************************************************************************************************************************

It is important to note that the Employment Appeals Tribunal and the Rights Commissioner service are not courts of law and cannot award your costs of representation.

Both parties will pay their own costs.

These include

• The Rights Commissioner service

• The Employment Appeals Tribunal

• The Labour Court

• The Labour Relations Commission

• The Equality Tribunal

• The Courts

• The Health and Safety Authority

• The National Employment Rights Authority (NERA)

Here is a brief look at these bodies and their remit. There is also a table below which gives a summary of where to go, the time limit, remedies available, and where appeals can be taken.

Elsewhere on this site you will see the occasions when you have to go to one of these bodies or the other as breaches of various pieces of employment law legislation occurs.

Rights Commissioner

The Rights Commissioner service can deal with transfer of undertakings, unfair dismissals (if there is no objection by either party), health and safety, protection of employment, protection of young persons in employment, protection of fixed term workers, adoptive leave issues, carer’s leave, industrial relations, minimum wages, organisation of working time, terms of employment, payment of wages, parental leave, maternity protection, persons reporting child abuse.

Take a look at the Labour Relations Commission website at www.lrc.ie for more information and to download the relevant forms.

rights-commissioner-service

Employment Appeals Tribunal

The Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT) is the traditional venue for unfair dismissal cases, even though a Rights Commissioner can hear such a case provided there is no objection by either party. The EAT can determine cases itself  in certain circumstances as well as deal with appeals from decisions of the Rights Commissioner.

It can hear cases concerning minimum notice, terms of employment, payment of wages, organization of working time, transfer of undertakings, parental leave, redundancy payments, carers leave, maternity protection, adoptive leave, and more.

Labour Court

The Labour Court is essentially an industrial relations tribunal, notwithstanding it’s name. It’s principal task is to attempt to resolve industrial relations disputes.

Whilst it can hear cases at first instance in certain matters such as organisation of working time, protection of employment, industrial relations, protection of part time employment, protection of fixed term employment, employment equality and minimum wages it sees itself as a forum of last resort and cases should only be referred to it when all other attempts at dispute resolution have failed.

Labour Relations Commission

The Labour Relations Commission is concerned with industrial disputes and providing the Rights Commissioner Service.

The Equality Tribunal

The Office of the Director of Equality Investigation (the Equality Tribunal) is the venue for redress under the Employment Equality Acts. Decisions of the Equality Tribunal can be appealed to the Labour Court.

The Courts

The Civil Courts deal with applications for injunctions, wrongful dismissal, and breach of contract. The can also hear appeals from the other forums above.

The Health and Safety Authority is concerned with occupational health and safety and can prosecute breaches of health and safety law. It also plays a large role in the enforcement of anti bullying and harassment policies and procedures in the workplace.

NERA (National Employment Rights Authority)

NERA’s primary function  is to provide information to employers and employees and to monitor and inspect employment conditions. It can also prosecute breaches and enforce compliance re holidays, organisation of working time, dismissal, notice, working time, and payment of wages.

It’s enforcement services unit can attempt to have determinations of the Labour Court or EAT enforced through the Courts. (However you might be better off engaging the services of a solicitor and pursuing this yourself as it is likely to be quicker.)

Legislation Forum Time Limit Redress/Remedy Appeal
Adoptive Leave Acts, 1995-2005 Rights Commissioner 6 months DecisionDirection20 weeks compensation Employment Appeals Tribunal
Carer’s Leave Act, 2001 Rights Commissioner 6 months DecisionGrant of Leave26 weeks compensation Employment Appeals Tribunal
Civil proceedings Civil Courts 6 years DamagesInjunction
Data Protection Acts, 1988 & 2003 Data protection commissioner Na Enforcement noticeProhibition noticePenalties Circuit CourtHigh Court
Employment equality acts, 1998-2007 Equality tribunal 6 months Equal payArrears of remunerationUp to 2 years compensation Labour Court
Equal Status Acts, 2000-2004 Equality tribunal 6 months DecisionCompensation up to €6,349An order Circuit Court
European Communities (protection of employment) regulations, SI 488/2000 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionCompensation up to 4 weeks remuneration EAT
European Communities (protection of employees of transfer of undertakings) SI 131/2003 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionCompensation up to 4 weeks remuneration (breach of regulation 8) EATCompensation if breach of any regulation other than 8
Industrial Relations Acts, 1946-2004 Rights commissionerLabour Court RemunerationRecommendationDetermination Labour Court
Maternity Protection Acts, 1994-2004 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionDirectionsGrant leaveCompensation up to 20 weeks’ pay EAT
Minimum Notice and terms of employment acts, 1973-2001 Employment appeals tribunal 6 months Up to 8 weeks’ pay compensation High Court on a point of law only
National Minimum Wages Act, 2000 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionArrearsReasonable expensesEmployer to remedy breach Labour court
Organisation of Working Time Act, 1997 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionCompensation up to 2 years remuneration Labour court
Parental Leave Acts, 1998-2006 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionGrant of leaveCompensation up to 20 weeks’ remuneration EAT
Payment of Wages act, 1991 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionCompensation up to 2 years remuneration EAT
Protection of Employment Acts 1977-2007 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionCompensation up to 2 years remuneration Labour Court
Protection of Employees (fixed term work) act, 2003 Rights commissioner 6 months DecisionReinstatement/re-engagementCompensation up to 2 years compensation Labour Court
Protection of Employees (employers’ insolvency) act 1984-2004 Employment appeals tribunal 6 weeks Declaration that Minister is to make payment and specify amount High court
Protection of young persons (employment) act, 1996 Rights commissioner 6 months RecommendationCompensation as is equitable Eat
Redundancy Payments Acts, 1967-2007 Employment appeals tribunal 6 months Determination as to entitlement to lump sumEntitlement to rebates High court on a point of law
Safety, Health and welfare at work act, 2005 Health and safety authority Na Improvement noticeProhibition noticeDirection re improvement plan District court
Terms of employment (information) act, 1994 and 2001 Rights commissioner 6 months Recommendation to correct statementCompensation up to 4 weeks remuneration Eat
Unfair dismissal acts, 1977-2007 Rights commissionerEatCircuit courtHigh court Six months Recommendation from rights commissionerEat may award reinstatement, re-engagement or compensation of up to 2 years remunerationCircuit court may award damages for wrongful dismissal EatCircuit court

 

NOTE: most decisions can be appealed to the High Court on a point of law only.