New Employment Regulation Orders (ERO) in the Contract Cleaning and Security Industries-the Essentials

contract-cleaner-employment-regulation-order

Are you in the contract cleaning or security industries?

Good news if you are an employee: from October 1st, 2015 new Employment Regulation Orders (ERO) were signed into law.

Previously, in 2011, the JLC (Joint Labour Committee) system of setting pay and conditions was struck down by the Supreme Court as unconstitutional.

Contract Cleaning Workers

From 1st October, 2015 contract cleaner workers are entitled to be paid a minimum of €9.75 per hour for the 1st 44 hours.

The 1st four hours of overtime should be paid at time and a half with any further overtime being paid at double time.

Sunday hours will attract double time.

The contract cleaning ERO also provide terms and conditions for

  • Annual leave
  • Sick pay
  • Maternity leave
  • Disciplinary procedures

S.I. No 418 of 2015 Employment Regulation Order (Contract Cleaning Joint Labour Committee) 2015

The contract cleaning ERO applies to workers employed by undertakings engaged in whole or in part on the provision of cleaning and janitorial services in, or on the exterior  of,  establishments  including hospitals, offices, shops, stores, factories, apartment buildings, hotels, airports and similar establishments.

Security Industry Workers

Workers in the security industry will see their basic pay rise to €10.75 per hour minimum. All overtime over 48 hours attract pay at a rate of time and a half.

S.I. 417 of 2015 Employment Regulation Order (Security Industry Joint Labour Committee) 2015

The security industry ERO provides terms and conditions in respect of:

  • Annual Leave,
  • Sick Pay,
  • Training,
  • Hours of Work.

It applies to ‘security operatives’ meaning  a person employed by a security  firm  to  provide a security service for contract clients of that firm,  or  a  service  of a security or surveillance nature, the purpose of which is to protect persons and property.

Any breaches of an Employment Regulation Order may be referred to the Workplace Relations Commission for appropriate action.

Companies  may  be  able  to  derogate  from  EROs  in  cases  of financial difficulty, subject to meeting certain criteria.